Submitting Your Proposal? I Did.

23 Feb

Nothing seems more stressful than having to pare down a novel into a page or two synopsis, or worse yet a back cover blurb. As an author of romantic comedies, my characters and story lines tend to run in the hundreds of pages per book, with plots and subplots carved into the running chapters.

Yet submitting to an agent or publisher means first drafting a query letter, including a short blurb or paragraph encompassing the essence of the story hooking the person into wanting more. An elevator pitch, if you’re familiar with the term, describe your book in the few seconds you might have if a literary agent or publisher stepped into an elevator with you. Not many details, but must grab the person’s attention through emotion s or action.

If you pass this hurdle, next is submitting a synopsis of the book. In two to four pages you must describe the highlights of the plot and subplots, the ins and outs of the main characters and reveal the ending. Shocking, I know, but the publisher or agent needs to know you have a tightly wrapped up ending, nothing dangling in midair by the last page.

I just sent a proposal packet to Crimson Romance for the sequel of “Her Ghost Wears Kilts.” Now begins the waiting – will it be accepted or not? The new book is titled “Frolic and Foibles” sharing the same crazy characters with a new villain. Think good thoughts to the publishing fairy it will be picked up for 2015.

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